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Front Country & Lindsay Lou

Front Country & Lindsay Lou

Rachel Baiman

Thu · May 9, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$10.00 - $12.00

This event is 18 and over

VALID GOV'T ISSUED PHOTO ID REQUIRED - NO EXCEPTIONS

Front Country
Front Country
Front Country forged a sound that lies somewhere between indie folk and Americana—a genre some might call “Roots Pop”: the past is discernible with a wink and a nod, and the future is here. They’re working to translate the incredibly intricate arrangements and structures of the best pop songs into an organic, on-the-fly acoustic string band.
Lindsay Lou
Lindsay Lou
Lindsay Lou has been making soulful, poignant music for the last decade. An
undeniable powerhouse, Lou’s remarkable gifts as a singer, songwriter, musician
and performer demand the listener’s attention. Her singing floats over the
masterful playing and deep groove of her band with both a fierce intensity and
a tender intimacy.
Lindsay Lou’s fourth album, Southland (released April 2018), is a transformative
and heart-wrenching ten-song stunner. Lou’s voice—and its unique ability to
create an expansive, almost physically tangible soundscape—carries each song
on Southland forward, made even more recognizable and potent by bandmates
Josh Rilko (mandolin, vocals) and PJ George (bass, vocals) and special guests.
The beauty with which the sounds on Southland slip into the ether is the product of an emotionally difficult time for Lindsay and her band—
who, as musicians often do, entered the studio to “hash it out.” The process, demonstrated by the music on Southland, was sincere and
stirring and introspective.
Southland kicks off with “Roll With Me,” an expansive anthem with Lou’s robust vocals on full display. “Go There Alone” was written during
an “Immersion Composition Society” experiment that Lou does from time to time, and the sound fully developed with the band a little later
on. The lazy, beautiful harmonies pull at your heartstrings in a way that feels like home, despite the lonely and bittersweet message. And
though songs like “The Voice” and “Southland” were spurred on by more abstract ideas and words, they transformed as collaborators started
freestyling with their instruments and Lou simply sang what came to mind. Impressively enough, Lou plays electric bass, electric guitar, and
acoustic guitar on the album’s title track. “Southland” is about the natural beauty of the South, which to Lou, adds a sense of calm and
connectedness to a region known too often for its divisiveness. Having recently left her home state of Michigan to put down roots in Nashville
with the band, the influence of this change is felt throughout the themes and ideas expressed on Southland.
Born the daughter of a coal miner in middle Missouri, Lindsay Lou’s family moved to Michigan shortly after Lindsay was born. She describes
her family as close knit and musical, their lives influenced heavily by her maternal grandmother’s radical ideals and zest for life. In fact, if you
ask Lindsay, her grandmother—a woman who was once put in jail during the Civil Rights Movement for teaching a lesson on the “f” word as
a high school literature teacher—is one of her greatest influences to this day. Armed with her activist spirit, Lou’s grandmother set up a
Christian commune in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula for her growing family of twelve, as well as some stragglers. There in a big farmhouse,
Lou’s dad was their neighbor.
Raised with this sense of community, Lou recalls always being surrounded by music. So when the time came for her to join a band, for Lou,
it felt like finding a home away from home. Her career, like her life, have been full of great moments of kismet. As a youth, Lou built her
repertoire by practicing her vocals, and she picked up the guitar so she could play with her Uncle Stuckey, perhaps most musically influential
on her of her mother’s siblings. The skills she honed during the days of learning to sing and play with her family led to a wide variety of
musical opportunities, singing in choir in high school, attending an elite summer program at Interlochen on scholarship, and winning awards
for her talents.
Today, touring nationally and internationally year round, Lindsay Lou and her band continue to collect a mass of friends and fans along the
way. Notable U.S. festival plays include Telluride Bluegrass festival, Merlefest, Stagecoach, Redwing, ROMP, GreyFox, and a slew of others.
Abroad, they have appeared at Scotland’s Shetland Island Folk Fest and the Celtic Connections tour, Australia’s National Folk Festival, and
others. Of the live show, fRoots Magazine reviewed “...[Lindsay Lou is] the most affectingly expressive singer since Amy Winehouse, backed
by the new Punch Brothers.” The Boot, who featured Lindsay Lou Band as a “Can’t Miss Act at AmericanaFest 2018, says “...Lou brings
introspection and masterful vocal work to her live show.”
In the words of famed bluegrass musician David Grier, who caught Lindsay Lou Band at a recent festival, “Lindsay...sings the way you would
want to if'n you could. Phrasing, tone, emotion, it's all there. Effortless seemingly. Simply mesmerizing. Riveting! Don't miss the musical force
that is Lindsay Lou.”
Rachel Baiman
Rachel Baiman
Rachel Baiman’s June 2017 label debut Shame was featured on NPR’s “Songs We Love”, called a “Rootsy Wake-up Call” by Folk Alley, and described by Vice’s “Noisey” as “flipping off authority one song at a time.” Now Baiman has announced Thanksgiving (out November 2 on Free Dirt Records), a self-produced four-song EP, featuring her live trio as well as special guests including Molly Tuttle and Josh Oliver

Thanksgiving is a collection of music to inspire an introspective holiday spirit. The songs center around themes of Indigenous Rights, home and homelessness, and love in hard times. “Thanksgiving has always been one of my favorite holidays,” says Baiman. “But two years ago in November, the fight against the Dakota Access Pipeline was in full swing, and it just got me thinking about how the relationship between indigenous and white people in this country has hardly changed at all over the years. The irony of Thanksgiving being celebrated right as people were being arrested and sprayed with water guns for protecting their right to clean water really hit me”.

The EP opens with the jovial sounding “Tent City” which features a hard-driving bluegrass band. However, the slaphappy sound becomes erie as the lyrics sink in , The song is from the perspective of a man who has fallen from his picturesque middle class lifestyle into homelessness and addiction. Yet the matter-of-fact delivery huamizes his story and gives context to a character who might otherwise be treated as a statistic.

The collection is not all doom and gloom, however, as the first two darker tracks are followed by the cheerful John Hartford number “Madison Tennessee. “I’m getting married this year,” says Baiman, “My fiance and I recently moved out to Madison and have been fixing up a little cabin on the river. I spend so much time traveling, it’s an amazing feeling to finally put down some roots and work on creating a magical and inspiring space. This Hartford tune makes me feel giddy about home and for me thats what Thanksgiving is all about.” “Madison Tennessee” features bluegrass guitar virtuoso and Americana Music Association “Instrumentalist of the Year” Molly Tuttle, who toured in a duo with Baiman in 2018.

“Times Like These, the EP’s final track, features guitar player and singer Josh Oliver, another of Baiman’s frequent musical collaborators. Ending on an uplifting note, the song is a testament to the good that gets us through the bad. “Open the window / And let in the breeze / Darling I need you / Living in times like these,” sing Baiman and Oliver in emotive harmony. Oliver’s beautifully tragic voice hits the listener like teardrops on a page.


Baiman’s Thanksgiving is an intriguing follow up to Shame, allowing her a chance to stretch out stylistically, moving effortlessly between bluegrass, to bolk, old-time and country. The bittersweet lyricism she’s become known for conveys the push and pull of hardship and hope we often feel during the holiday season.

Raised in Chicago by a radical economist and a social worker, Baiman was surrounded by social justice issues her entire life. “If I wanted to rebel against my parents I could have become a finance banker or a corporate lawyer” she says of her childhood. While her classmates went to church or temple on Sunday mornings, Baiman attended the Ethical Humanist Society of Greater Chicago, a non-religious community formed around discussions of morality and current events. “That was always a tough one to explain at school” she says with a laugh.

As a teenager, Baiman found music to be a welcome escape from worrying about global politics. “I often found the constant discussion of seemingly unsolvable problems to be intense and overwhelming, and when I moved to Nashville to pursue music it felt like something positive, beautiful and productive that I could put into the world. Now that I’ve had some years to devote to music,”—Baiman has been recording and touring internationally for the past 4 years with 10 String Symphony, and has played fiddle for numerous other artists including Kacey Musgraves and Winnipeg folk band Oh My Darling—“I find it hard to escape from the values that I grew up with, and I feel compelled to write politically, to speak out about things that I’ve experienced or seen. Songwriting is a unique opportunity to do that, because it avails a more emotional vehicle for discussion. I love the political tradition of folk music, from Woody Guthrie to Tupac, and my hope is that this record adds another voice to it.”
Venue Information:
The High Watt
One Cannery Row
Nashville, TN, 37203
http://thehighwatt.com/