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Unplugged for Project Yesu

Unplugged for Project Yesu

Wed · May 2, 2018

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

$10.00

This event is 18 and over

David Bornè
David Bornè
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Colin Elmore
Colin Elmore
Born into a musical family in Willow Springs, MO, Colin grew up surrounded by an atmosphere of music in the Ozark Hills. He first began writing original songs at the age of 16, with deeply personal lyrics even at a young age.

Prior to moving to Nashville, Colin earned a significant fan base in the thriving music scene of Springfield, MO. At the start of his career Colin was apart of a band that was named the #1 Alternative Rock band in Springfield, the band gained notoriety for their inventive sound and theatrical stage presence. Colin moved on to work with Arkansas based sibling band "The Franz Family" which he made his debut solo record with entitled "This Side of the Sun" recorded at the legendary Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tn.

Colin continued to perform solo and with friends, finally joining forces with the Danville Train out of Franklin, Tennessee.
"We met my first night in Nashville. I was in town considering the move and happened to touch base with our friends from the band SHEL, who invited me to a barbeque at Jake Finch's house (drummer for the Danville Train). We ended up playing country tunes on his back porch for something like 4 hours. It was basically love at first sight". Elmore says. The group formed out of that night and eventually went into the studio with producer Teddy Morgan (The Alternate Routes, Kevin Costner and the Modern West) to record their upcoming EP "The Wild Blue".
Kree Harrison
Kree Harrison
The highly anticipated debut single from Kree Harrison is finally here. “This Old Thing” is the title track to Kree’s live, studio album recorded at Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, NC. “This Old Thing” embodies the timeless sound that Kree has spent her entire life working toward. Although timeless, This Old Thing is modern and was recently described as “fresh, now and tomorrow” by CMT’s Stacey Cato.

Although only 25, the sharp lyrics and deep emotional expressions make the listener feel like she is a seasoned veteran. That’s because she has been doing this her entire life. At the ripe age of 3, she belted out Amy Grant’s “El-Shaddai” at her local church in Woodville, TX. Kree signed an artist development deal with Lyric Street Records at 10 and moved to Nashville shortly after. While looking for songs to record, she declared that she wanted to record “He Called Me Baby” by Harlan Howard. That dream was fulfilled 15 years later in North Carolina when she finally recorded that song she was drawn to so many years before.

Many know Kree from American Idol Season 12 where she finished runner-up in 2013. American Idol did an amazing job of highlighting her vocal talent, but the show only scratched the surface of Kree’s artistry. In early 2015, Kree signed with Nashville’s independent Plaid Flag Music and began writing with her album in mind. She ended up co-penning 9 of the 13 songs on the album, stretching from before Idol to her time with Plaid Flag in 2015.

Many times Kree has said, “This record has been 15 years in the making.” There are numerous examples from songs written or inspired during her childhood that illustrate this fact. As cliché as it may sound, this album has truly been a product of the last 15 years of Kree’s life. The significance of This Old Thing as the album title, title track, first track on the album sequence and first song released is not an accident. This has been a life-long dream of Kree’s, but it’s been worth the wait.
Jason Martin
Jason Martin
I’m 31, originally from Plaquemine, Louisiana (just outside of Baton Rouge). I play rock and roll.

My dad Harold Bell Martin Jr., taught me how to play guitar at age 5. Having the patience of a 5 year old, I didn’t really catch on until I was 14. As soon as I got good enough to play “Free Bird”, I spent 11 years playing dive bars and casinos with cover bands throughout the Southeast. Had tons of fun, too much probably, but I finally decided that shit wasn’t worth the money, so I started writing my own songs and moved to Nashville in 2011. I had a friend in Nashville, so I came to visit him and instantly fell in love with the place. The second time I visited, I started renting a 2 bedroom/1 bathroom house in East Nashville, near Rosepepper.

After the move, I didn’t really have a purpose or a drive aside from getting drunk, writing songs and making money. With the move I released my first ever recorded EP called “First Sign of Light”. It’s garbage, no one should listen to it, but at the time, those songs meant something to me. 2011 flew by and before I knew it, I lost my job, and had some family drama and I needed to be with them, so I moved back.

It broke my heart, leaving Nashville. I resented every day I didn’t live there, I fell into a sloppy, depressed pit of drugs and drinking. I recorded a full length album called “The Blackout Sessions”, inspired by life at the time. It too was garbage, the guy who mixed it was actually deaf in one ear, but again, it meant something at the time. The album actually did pretty well though. The studio I worked at did foley for movies and got me a placement in a straight to TV christian film (I don’t consider myself a christian artist in any way shape or form). But because of that, the record did ok. In turn, I got to open for these folks: Marc Broussard, The Whigs, Turnpike Troubadours, Kevin Fowler (I had a booking agent who thought I was country for a while for some reason) and some other people I can’t remember. Aside from that 2012-2014 were some dark times for old J-bird (that’s what I call myself in my head). I needed a re-boot.

Early 2014, I got a management deal from a buddy in the metal industry and his boss, they funded an EP called “Welcome Home”. I actually still like some of the tunes on this one. I played some shows with it, but ultimately, nothing happened and I lost the management deal and paid them back.

Late 2014 I started getting calls from some friends in Nashville to play guitar for them. So, July 2015, I moved back to Nashville. Got me a good woman, and as a whole, I feel like I have most of my shit together. Two years later, after writing a shit ton of songs, I feel like I have 10 good ones that I plan on putting out soon. That’s my story thus far. Thanks for reading

-Jason Charles Martin
Sarah Davidson
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Steve Everett
Steve Everett
Born in Albany, GA, raised in Greensboro, NC, Steve blends acoustic guitar with catchy, melodic hooks and hip, clever lyrics to form his upbeat and fun musical style. Steve studied music performance at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC and plays stages ranging from The House of Blues, The Rock Boat music festival, all the way to acoustic home shows. He has been fortunate enough to tour the country (solo & full band) with national acts like Sister Hazel & Michael Tolcher. His most two most recent albums have been nominated for "Album Of The Year" at The 12th & 15th annual Independent Music Awards. Steve also loves film, golf, sports, cigars... & high-fives.
Sister Justice
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Drew Dixon
Drew Dixon
Born and raised in the south, Dixon's musical upbringing centered mainly around rock, soul, gospel, and R&B. His father's record collection and his mother's hymnal formed the basis of his musical knowledge, until he left home for The University of Georgia, where he continued to learn and surround himself with talents far superior to his.

For the last 6 years, Dixon has called Nashville, TN, home, while continuing to tour extensively. 2015 saw the release of both his debut and follow up singles, "Dead Man," and "All of My Pain." Both singles, accompanies by music videos, received a strong welcome from the industry and fans alike.

2016 was a busy year for Dixon, who shared sold out venues with acts like Chase Rice, Kaleo, LANco, and Ryan Hurd. Riding the momentum of his 2015 releases, Dixon has been writing with some of Nashville's top up-and-coming artists, as well as playing shows nationwide, including his first international shows in Mexico. 2017 hasn't slowed down, with a new single--Madam D's--released in April topping out in the Top 15 on iTunes, and follow ups South Carolina (Sept) and Whiskey and Wine (Nov) rounding out the year.
Bentley Caldwell
Bentley Caldwell
NASHVILLE HAS MANY SOUNDS...
.... It sounds country, pop, and by all means ‘radio-friendly.’ But there’s a wrinkle in Nashville’s genre status that’s begging for soulful folk music. The sound that returns people to their roots, but their ear hasn’t quite settled on. Bentley Caldwell is forming that sound. Soulful as an Otis Redding record, Bentley’s catalog seems as though it would be more at home in a dusty old record shop, but is characterized by his thrilling lyrics, which soothe the ear of the 21st century.

Raised in Paducah, Kentucky, Caldwell had a traditional upbringing and sang in both youth and men’s choir in his little hometown Baptist church. The summer before Bentley’s senior year, he was selected for Kentucky Governor’s School of the Arts. He was also offered a scholarship to Western Kentucky University for vocal music, but declined it and went to community college for a few years instead. While he was there, he ended up winning the last ticket to see BB King perform a sold out show. “He looked like a Lego man onstage. I felt his performance all the way from my seat in the nosebleed section and deep in my chest.. I walked out of that show and my life was forever changed. I had to sing and play the blues.. or something as close to it as possible,” said Bentley. He later transferred to Western Kentucky, and after a brief stint as a history major, quickly embraced the strange pull of what he loved leading him down a different path. Without hesitation, he switched his major and began learning vocal techniques he would later use. Bentley found his voice, and slowly started to realize that he could use it for a living. Upon graduation, Bentley taught English in South Korea for two years. South Korea provided a change in creative space where he learned to play guitar. He moved back to Paducah, gained the confidence to play open mic nights, and began writing songs. Shortly after, his job at the time relocated him to Nashville, an almost startling turn for someone who was beginning to form his soulful, emotion-heavy groove.

Growing up in a single parent home, Bentley acknowledges how much his mother shaped him into who he is today. While growing up, she only allowed gospel and Christian music, with a little old-school soul thrown in. “We were poor, but we didn’t know it. She worked so hard to provide for my brother and I, and there was always love in the house.

Mom would take us to downtown Paducah on Saturdays and we'd browse the boxes for 45's to play on our record player. We'd walk away with ten 45's for next to nothing,” said Bentley. "I remember listening to some of the greatest soul voices ever and just being in awe of the raw emotion." The music of his early years shaped him, with his influences now being the likes of Otis Redding, Ray Charles, and Teddy Pendergrass. His mother passed away suddenly in 2013 and kindled a dark but introspective time for him. On the threshold of self-destruction, he felt as if

he had been in Nashville for several years, but nothing was working out, and he wasn’t taking music seriously. Working through the pain from the loss of his mother, Caldwell channeled his energy into pursuing what he really wanted. In November of 2013, he recorded his first EP, and released it the following March on his mother’s birthday. A Place To Be channeled raw emotion, depth, and emotionally captured the thoughts he wrestled with at the time. The EP documents the human condition, as Bentley calls it, and surveys life on a reflective, honest level. It’s easy to see his mother’s impact on him in holding his values close, and the light she projects over his life is clear to everyone who hears Caldwell’s honest folk lyrics.

One of the most interesting things about Bentley’s music is the sincerity in his tone. It resonates, and yet bends to the soulful intonations, similar to singing style of John Legend or Amos Lee. With Caldwell being magnetized towards singers such as Ray Lamontagne, Jamie Cullum, and other soul greats, it’s easy to want to place a traditional genre on him and watch his style flourish within it, but that doesn’t work. Caldwell’s unique approach to every note leaves his audience holding on to see where he lands. His vocals have a mysterious and suspenseful vibe, and paired with his crisp, folk-soul music, he captivates and commands attention. His candid expression within his lyrics instantly fastens his fans to him, almost as if whoever listens is instantly family. There’s a sincere honesty in his sound, and its simplicity rings through the end of each note. Bentley was recently nominated “Nashville’s Best Emerging Artist of 2014” by Deli Magazine and is currently writing music for a new EP, to be released in 2016. In his music, Bentley chooses emotion over all other aspects of his writing. “Whether it be physically, mentally, or emotionally, music should move you,” he says. "If it doesn’t, it wasn’t created from the soul."
Ariana Hodes
Ariana Hodes
Ariana Hodes is one of those artists that may convince you she was born in the wrong era while sounding refreshingly modern at the same time, like Joni Mitchell meets Florence Welch. “I’m a sponge for sound because I was listening to music since before I was born.” Her mother, a classically trained soprano, and father, a self-taught guitarist and recording engineer met making music, and included their kids in the tradition. “When I got big enough to help with load in and load out I carried mic stands. When I learned how to count I manned the merch table.” Ariana’s soulful twist around rootsy melodies defies the Country label, though she insists Nashville is the place for her. “It’s all about the song, and that’s what I’ve tried to do: write a gadang good song. A song with a good groove, and a little something you can hum along to never did nobody any harm.” This tour is to “get them out there just me and my guitar; to see if they’ve got legs as long as mine or what.”



Developing her own sound has been both a challenge and a journey that has taken her from coast to coast, but now she calls Nashville home. Playing around town at venues like 3rd & Lindsley, Mercy Lounge, The Basement, and Springwater Supperclub, Ariana has gotten the Nashvillian Nod from more than one bar regular. Ariana says living in Music City has inspired her material and the way she approaches being an artist. “There are so many amazing songwriters in this town that care about the truth, and writing songs that are true, that are real. Now is the time. If I don't say something because I'm afraid, then I'll know it’s weak-sauce while I'm singing it, and everybody else will too. I'm not trying to make ‘shut up and sing’ music, but there’s something for everybody I hope. Because music is connection, and we sure need that.” Ariana pens songs about love, long nights, and standing up for what you believe in. Whatever your politics though, her big hooks and sweeping melodies will keep you grooving way past her last note.
Darla Pietra
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Andrew Combs
Andrew Combs
“Ever heard of a happy song?”

That question is posed to Andrew Combs in “Rainy Day Song”, the lead track on his acclaimed 2015 album All These Dreams, during a barstool chat with a sarcastic friend. The singer – offended but gracious – smiles and allows the moment to pass, eschewing confrontation for the sake of a gem he polishes as an afterthought for the listener: “Tab’s on me if you think I’m lying / Laughing ain’t a pleasure till you know about crying.” The moment, full of the understated charm and pulsing honesty that defines his music, and is as good a metaphor as any for the songcraft of Andrew Combs.

A Dallas native now living near the same Nashville airport immortalized in the opening sequence of Robert Altman’s country music odyssey, Andrew Combs is a singer, songwriter, guitarist, and heir to that 1975 film’s idea of the Nashville troubadour as a kind of musical monk. Here in the twenty-first century whorl of digital narcissism, where identity can feel like a 24/7 social media soft-shoe performance, Combs makes music that does battle with the unsubtle. Like the pioneering color photographer William Eggleston, he sees the everyday and the commonplace as the surest paths to transcendence, and he understands intuitively that what is most obvious is often studded with the sacred. As a songwriter, Combs relies on meditative restraint rather than showy insistence to paint his canvases, a technique commensurate with his idea of nature as an overflowing spiritual wellspring. NPR music critic Ann Powers noted as much in a 2015 review: “His song-pictures are gorgeous, but he recognizes their impermanence as he sings.” This deeply felt sense of ecology, of the transient beauty within nature’s chaotic churn, lies at the heart of Combs’s approach to his art.

After touring behind All These Dreams, a record that earned him international accolades and comparisons to everyone from Leonard Cohen to Mickey Newbury to Harry Nilsson, Combs has returned with a new album that puts down stakes in fresh sonic terrain. Canyons of My Mind, out in March on New West, is — as its title suggests — a landscape where the personal and the pastoral converge. Drawing inspiration from the biographies of literary figures like Charles Wright and Jim Harrison, Combs has created an album that explores the notion of “sustainability” in its many facets — artistic, economic, spiritual, environmental.

"When I set out to record All These Dreams, I had a distinct vision of what I wanted the record to sound like. It was a cocktail of the Roy Orbison, Glen Campbell, Nilsson vibes that you can hear right there on the surface," Combs says. "Canyons of My Mind is much more personal. It’s a testament to my acceptance of who I am as a man, and who I am becoming.” The record’s sonic adventurousness bears witness to that evolution, as well as to some big changes in his personal life. Between All These Dreams and Canyons, Combs married his longtime girlfriend Kristin, with whom he honeymooned for six weeks in the Minnesota wilderness. “She walks through her life exuding such open-mindedness and kindness,” Combs says. “I can’t help but watch in awe. She lets me be whoever I want to be, and that’s new to me. And quite refreshing, and freeing.”

The quiet struggles and satisfactions of carving out an identity in a world gone wrong are palpable throughout the album. Whether questing through the labyrinth of his own spiritual yearning, (“Heart of Wonder”), recreating a rail rider’s full-body sensation of freedom beneath an azure Montana sky (“Rose Colored Blues”), imagining a near-future dystopia where the very idea of green spaces has been annihilated (“Dirty Rain”), or channeling the desire of a peeping Tom who has fallen in love with his sylvan quarry (“Hazel”), Combs refines the vulnerable vagabond persona he mastered on All These Dreams while pushing it beyond those boundaries, into a more pastoral realm aligned with artists like Nick Drake and Tim Buckley. The idea of the artist’s creative life as an ecosystem — one just as in need of cultivation and care as our own imperiled world — informs much of Canyons. For Combs, the quest to sustain his own capacity to create on a daily basis is what drives him. “I want to create for the rest of my life — writing, singing, painting,” he says. “I also want my life to include a family, a house, and kids. Seeking out other artists who’ve been able to keep the lights on without compromising their art – that keeps me inspired.”
Venue Information:
The High Watt
One Cannery Row
Nashville, TN, 37203
http://thehighwatt.com/