There are currently no videos. Check back soon.
Charlie Parr

Charlie Parr

Shannon LaBrie, Reed Turchi

Tue · October 17, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$12.00 - $14.00

This event is 18 and over

Charlie Parr
Charlie Parr
Fans who have been following Charlie Parr through his previous 13 full-length albums and decades of nonstop touring already know that the Duluth-based songwriter has a way of carving a path straight to the gut. On his newest record, Dog, however, he seems to be digging deeper and hitting those nerves quicker than ever before.

“I want my son to have this when I’m gone,” Charlie sings not 10 seconds into the opening song on Dog, “Hobo.” His voice sounds weary but insistent, his accompaniment sparse and sorrowful. By the second line, the listener has no choice but to be transported on a journey through the burrows of his troubled mind, following him through shadowy twists and turns as he searches for a way out.

It turns out Charlie’s been grappling with quite a bit over these past few years. As he prepares to release his new album on Red House Records this fall, he’s just as candid about discussing his experiences in person as he is while singing on the heat-rending Dog.

“I had some really, really bad depression problems over the last couple years,” Charlie explains. “I've been trying to get fit, trying not to drink so much, trying not to do the rock 'n' roll guy thing. And then I got depressed. Really depressed. And to me, depression feels like there's me, and then there's this kind of hazy fog of rancid jello all around me, that you can't feel your way out of. And then there's this really, really horrible third thing, this impulsive thing, that doesn't feel like it's me or my depression. It feels like it's coming from outside somewhere. And it's the thing that comes on you all of a sudden, and it's the voice of suicide, it's the voice of ‘quit.’”

“These songs have all kind of come out of that. Especially songs like ‘Salt Water’ and ‘Dog,’ they really came heavily out of just being depressed, and having to say something about it.”
Shannon LaBrie
Shannon LaBrie
Shannon LaBrie: War & Peace (official release April 1st)

Music by Nashville chanteuse Shannon LaBrie defies genre and brings to life insightful stories of a woman who remains true to herself in a life where uncertainty is certain. The Lincoln, NE native instantly became a favorite among music fans and critics alike with her powerful 2013 debut Just Be Honest. With her lead single, "I Remember a Boy," the independent release reached inside the Top Ten on iTunes and the Triple A Radio charts. Famed music blogger Bob Lefsetz wrote, "This track affected me. Made me believe like the great singer-songwriters of yore, maybe this woman has something to say. That in this crazy, mixed up, shoot-up world she can illuminate her story and people can relate."

In April 2016, LaBrie returns with her introspective sophomore album, War & Peace. Tracked live at Nashville's House of Blues Studio D with producer Tom Michael, War & Peace is an emotionally-charged collection of deep Americana soul that gives voice to the love and loss Labrie experienced throughout her life. "When I listen to music," Labrie says, "a lot of times, it's to make me feel good. But a lot of other times, it's to make me not feel alone. I started writing this album after a loss that put me at war with everything in my life. These songs are small doses of the war I feel inside and the peace I long to find."

The title track "War & Peace," is inspired by her boyfriend's unwavering commitment to their relationship following the loss of their unborn son -- a tragedy that continues to shake LaBrie's heart to this day. "I feel very fortunate that we made it through the past five years." LaBrie continues to explore love in the stirring rocker "It Took My Whole Life." The smooth and steady "Crumble" addresses how consuming love can feel, and the soulful "Ain't Just a Feeling" captures the solace love provides. "There was a time when love was a far-off dream," she says. "Feeling good, feeling like a woman, feeling beautiful wasn't something that came easily. 'Ain't Just a Feeling' came from a moment when I was able to step out of the sadness and just be happy."

LaBrie calls out American politicians in the fiery opener "It's Political," while "American Dream," celebrates feeling thankful to live in a country that offers its citizens a life of endless possibility as a basic human right.

Anchoring the soul of the album are the deeply emotional "Alcohol" and "Heaven Crashed Down." "Alcohol" is a moving ballad about trying to save a loved one from a life of addiction, but in trying, only kills the savior. In LaBrie's own words "There are people who are addicted to alcohol and there are people addicted to trying to fix the people addicted to alcohol. It's all addiction." In "Heaven Crashed Down," LaBrie gives a visual account of the painful loss of her father to cancer when she was only 13. She sings, "He was all we had, he was all I'd lost. The morning heaven crashed down, I grew up."

Austin Chronicle calls LaBrie, "a true guitarist singer/songwriter whose soulful voice's sensual honey-crisp highs brings to mind the late, great Jeff Buckley." She has opened for Gabe Dixon, Phoenix, ZZ Ward, The Head and the Heart, The Wild Feathers, Michael Franti and Valerie June. Her résumé includes South By Southwest, the Austin City Limits Festival, Road to the Hangout and Road to Bonnaroo.
Reed Turchi
Reed Turchi
Raised in the Swannanoa Valley just outside of Asheville, North Carolina, Reed Turchi grew up playing piano, focusing on boogie woogie and New Orleans styles before becoming infatuated with slide guitar. While learning Hill Country Blues (RL Burnside, Junior Kimbrough, Mississippi Fred McDowell) firsthand in North Mississippi, he founded his blues-rock trio “TURCHI,” which released its debut album Road Ends in Water in 2012. Called "everything a blues fan could want" (LA Examiner), the album featured guest Luther Dickinson on three tracks.

After a series of national tours, TURCHI released Live in Lafayette in early 2013, and exploded on the blues-rock scene, notably earning high praise from Living Blues Magazine ("for all of their communion with the past, TURCHI sounds vital, alive, and essential"), landing on the cover of Buscadero (Italy) and being showcased in a five-page feature in Il Blues Magazine (Italy). At that point, TURCHI’s national touring grew to include Europe, highlighted with a headlining spot at Mojo Festival (Rome) in June 2014 after the release of Can’t Bury Your Past, which expanded the trio with keyboards/organ (Anthony Farrell) and saxophone (Art Edmaiston).

Also in 2014, stemming from his tours in Italy, Reed began collaborating with renowned Italian guitarist Adriano Viterbini, leading to Scrapyard, an intimate, intense, guitar duo album recorded in Memphis and in Rome. Called "a marvelous example of talent and simplicity" (Bluebird Reviews, UK), the album earned a editor’s feature from iTunes ("blues chemistry overflowing with earthy delta slide and dark pulsing electric guitar"), and a spot on Tidal’s “editor’s playlist.”

At around the same time, seeking new inspirations and sounds, Reed moved from Western North Carolina to Memphis, where he began digging into the trademark rhythms and styles that made the music from Stax and Muscle Shoals groove so powerful. It was a time of personal and musical change, leading Reed to disband TURCHI with the release of sendoff EP We Spoke in Song, recorded at an old JC Penney in Richmond VA amidst their final performances in October 2014.

As they toured in support of Scrapyard in Europe and the US, Adriano introduced Reed to Tuareg music (Tinariwen, Bombino, Terakaft). Back in Memphis, Reed wrote songs with a new sound and band in mind, and began recording at Ardent Studios in April 2015. The result, Speaking in Shadows, will be released March 4th 2016 on Devil Down Records.

Revealing musical and songwriting influences ranging from Randy Newman and JJ Cale to Beck, T Rex, and Tinariwen, Reed steps out from behind the gruff fuzz into a multi-faceted sound built on finely crafted songs and ear- & rear-moving grooves. Featuring an all-star group of musicians including drummer/bassist Paul Taylor, saxophonist Art Edmaiston, Andrew Trube and Anthony Farrell (Greyhounds), and Adriano Viterbini, Speaking in Shadows is built on a foundation of Memphis groove and fat-back rhythm. Fresh textures abound, from the carnival of sounds on tongue-in-cheek “Drawn and Quartered” to the heartbreaking vocals of Heather Moulder on the spare, haunting lead track “Pass Me Over.” As a songwriter, Turchi confidently mines the classic blues/rock vein in "Offamymind" ("Well I can barely walk, so I guess I oughta/ Get behind this wheel and drive”), effortlessly shifts gears to the satirical "Everybody's Waiting (for the end to come)," and turns introspective in "Looking Up Past Midnight." Reuniting with engineer Adam Hill (Big Star, Dirty Streets, White Stripes), Reed strikes out for new territory with co-production by Billy Bennett (MGMT, Drive-By Truckers, Los Colognes). The album was mastered by Andrija Tokic (Alabama Shakes, Natural Child, The Whigs) at Bombshelter Studios in East Nashville, with artwork and design from Charles Ritchie.

To implement the new album's sound live, Reed assembled The Caterwauls: Memphis drummer Andrew McNeill; Murfreesboro, TN-based slide guitarist Joey Fletcher; and Woodsbury, TN singer / piano player Heather Moulder. The Caterwauls combine soul, funk, rock, country, and gospel, creating deep grooving rhythms. Reed and The Caterwauls are preparing for a busy 2016, and the launch of Speaking in Shadows.
Venue Information:
The High Watt
One Cannery Row
Nashville, TN, 37203
http://thehighwatt.com/