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David Gray Tribute hosted by Colin Elmore, David Bornè & Jacob Thomas Jr.

David Gray Tribute hosted by Colin Elmore, David Bornè & Jacob Thomas Jr.

Matthew Perryman Jones, Paul McDonald, Bre Kennedy, Lydia Luce, Charles Johnson, Peter Bradley Adams

Thu · August 17, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$10.00

This event is 18 and over

Colin Elmore
Colin Elmore
Born into a musical family in Willow Springs, MO, Colin grew up surrounded by an atmosphere of music in the Ozark Hills. He first began writing original songs at the age of 16, with deeply personal lyrics even at a young age.

Prior to moving to Nashville, Colin earned a significant fan base in the thriving music scene of Springfield, MO. At the start of his career Colin was apart of a band that was named the #1 Alternative Rock band in Springfield, the band gained notoriety for their inventive sound and theatrical stage presence. Colin moved on to work with Arkansas based sibling band "The Franz Family" which he made his debut solo record with entitled "This Side of the Sun" recorded at the legendary Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tn.

Colin continued to perform solo and with friends, finally joining forces with the Danville Train out of Franklin, Tennessee.
"We met my first night in Nashville. I was in town considering the move and happened to touch base with our friends from the band SHEL, who invited me to a barbeque at Jake Finch's house (drummer for the Danville Train). We ended up playing country tunes on his back porch for something like 4 hours. It was basically love at first sight". Elmore says. The group formed out of that night and eventually went into the studio with producer Teddy Morgan (The Alternate Routes, Kevin Costner and the Modern West) to record their upcoming EP "The Wild Blue".
David Bornè
David Bornè
Jacob Thomas Jr.
Jacob Thomas Jr.
Born and raised in Southern Lousiana, one listen and Jacob Thomas Jr. would have you figuring he spent his youth performing in cowboy bars and trucker dives. You'd only be half right. While Saturday nights were spent cavorting with sinners, Sunday mornings would find him, albeit hungover at times, entertaining saints.
Outfitted with only his acoustic guitar and his voice, Original Sin, Thomas' debut LP, is a collection of experiences. With the majority of songs being first takes, the lack of production invites the listener to pay close attention to what's being said, the stories being told, and the heartbreak being felt or dealt. Jacob never pretends to be the good guy, and his honesty, which can be unsettling at times, is ultimately revealing.
Matthew Perryman Jones
Matthew Perryman Jones
Paul McDonald
Paul McDonald
“I’M TURNING ALL THESE LOWS INTO GLITTER, SILVER, AND GOLD/AND IT’S SO MUCH BETTER…”


Paul McDonald sings those words with soaring emotionality on “So Much Better,” a track from his upcoming debut, Modern Hearts. And those are the words of a man who has truly lived his lyrics.


Three years ago, after a heavily publicized divorce and the break-up of his former band, Paul left his life in LA in search of familiarity and solace. The Alabama-born artist found himself in East Nashville, feeling like a stranger in a region he once called home. That all changed when he picked up his guitar and began the process of what would become Modern Hearts.


“I had to take my life back and figure out who I was again,” he shares. “It took me a few years and a few hundred songs to get to that point.”


Paul story’s is the triumphant Modern Hearts, an album bursting with anthemic hooks, majestically textured alt-rock, tinges of Southern soul, literate introspection, and profound redemption. Previously, Paul’s broadly resonant musicality garnered him international acclaim and coverage from the likes of Rolling Stone, Billboard, MTV, etc., and enabled him to share the stage with a diverse array of classic and current icons. Select performance highlights include sharing the stage with artists such as Stevie Wonder, Zac Brown, Father John Misty, Steven Tyler, Emmylou Harris, and appearing at festivals such as Bonnaroo, SXSW, and Hangout Festival and performing on nationally televised shows like “Good Morning America” and “The Tonight Show.”


It could be said that Modern Hearts is a breakup record documenting spiritual and artistic uplift. The 14-track body of work represents a full-spectrum of emotions, from soulful and sorrowful tracks, to invigorating new-life anthems, to meditative mid-tempo numbers.


“Writing helped me a lot during that time. I would wake up every morning feeling lost, but once I started writing, I'd tell myself, ‘I'm right where I'm supposed to be and It’s all going to be all good.’” Paul says with a good-natured laugh. He continues: “And as I gained my confidence back as a human being and as an artist, I started writing more upbeat and hopeful songs.”


“Once You Were Mine” oozes Memphis soul. Replete with stately horns, silken vocals, confessional lyrics, and a simmering groove, it recalls prime Al Green. The boldly vulnerable title track unpacks the painful complexity of breakups in the digital age. The invigorating “Hold On” hits that post-breakup sweet spot where anger overtakes heartache. Modern Hearts also boasts a cadre of got-my-mojo-back tracks, one standout is the ambient and slow burner “Call On Me” which lunges forth with an ominous, dub-funk groove, and a vocal delivery that oozes virility. The track’s chorus kicks off with a time-standing-still moment before it rockets skyward with an irresistible soul pop hook.


Modern Hearts was produced by Jordan Lehning (Caitlin Rose, Rodney Crowell, Andrew Combs), and features an all star cast of studio musicians whose resumes include Cage The Elephant, James Bay, Shawn Mendes, Maren Morris, Nikki Lane, Kacey Musgraves, and Buddy Miller, among others. The album was tracked with ace musicians playing in real time with sympathetic band interplay at the vibey Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, NC (Band Of Horses, Avett Brothers). Additional recording took place at Sound Emporium Studios (Jason Isbell, Alabama Shakes) in Nashville, TN.


Today, Paul is no longer a stranger in Nashville, nor is he a stranger to himself. Upon completing the album, he debuted his new material live for the first time in town, and, despite not having a record commercially available at the time, he sold out the club in his adopted hometown of Music City. Looking back on the powerful journey represented by Modern Hearts, Paul says: “Making this record saved my life. I regained my confidence and my sense of self through the process. But what has made the journey worthwhile is having other people reach out to tell me that listening to these songs has helped them through a similar situation. For an artist, there’s no better feeling than sharing emotions and helping people find strength and clarity through your music. That’s the real prize.”


Modern Hearts is set for a late summer/early fall of 2017 release.
Bre Kennedy
Bre Kennedy
Single "Words" coming soon.
Lydia Luce
Lydia Luce
Lydia Luce graduated from Berklee College of Music and has a Masters Degree from UCLA in viola performance. As an independent Americana singer/songwriter/violist she is leveraging those tools to enhance her songwriting on both viola and guitar. Her lyrically moving and professionally architected music derives deep roots from personal family, love and life experiences and she is beginning to make a mark in her new home of Los Angeles. Luce is currently touring to promote her first record "The Tides."
www.lydialuce.com
Charles Johnson
Charles Johnson
Folk-rock singer/songwriter, Charles Johnson, is an unchained, raw talent, creating emotional and tangible music out of Nashville, TN. Pairing finger picked, driving guitar with his unique vocal delivery, he offers his explorations into American folk, rock, and country music.
Peter Bradley Adams
Peter Bradley Adams
No matter the form, when it comes to art, there are a number of different tacks to take. Some artists continually push their work across new horizons. Neil Young, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Joni Mitchell come to mind, in that regard. Others — Claude Monet, Jason Isbell, and Bonnie Raitt, among them — stand a bit more still in order to continually refine the capturing of their vision. Singer/songwriter Peter Bradley Adams falls into the latter category of perfectionists chasing their own perfection. With A Face Like Mine, he may well have caught it.

There's a confidence, a completeness in the song cycle that listeners have gleaned throughout Adams' illustrious career, but A Face Like Mine, his sixth solo effort, brings it all into sharp focus. As Adams sees it, “On the long plod of finding my voice as a singer and a writer, the singing has slowly developed from the sound of a scared guy to someone who believes what he's saying and the writing, I hope, has become less rigid — both in the lyrics and the phrasing.”

Less rigid, indeed. Adams' brand of Americana nestles his often delicate, always heartfelt voice in the warm embrace of gentle guitar, tasteful dobro, subtle banjo, supportive bass, and unhurried percussion. The result is a sonic scape that, in turn, wraps itself around the listener like a soft blanket on a cold day. With A Face Like Mine, Adams further refines the simple musical sophistication that has become his trademark.

Throughout the self-produced set, Adams tells tales of love and loss, homes and hearts. The territory he mines is a deliberate mix of fact and fantasy. “I feel like I'm, firstly, a storyteller, but it's inevitable that my own stuff gets in there deep. And it's funny how, sometimes, I don't realize it until the song is done,” he offers. “At the same time, there are times where I take very directly from an experience or a relationship, but I try to be very careful when that happens. I don't want to ever sound like a journal entry.”

Regardless of the details, there's always a philosophical bent that is often more under than on the surface, firmly grounding Adams' songs even as they stretch outward. By his own admission, Adams is a seeker who spends considerable time wrestling with matters of faith, though he's the first to admit he doesn't have any real answers. “I honestly don't know what the hell I'm doing... nor do I have the language for any of this stuff,” he says with a laugh. “But there is a constant tug on me in that direction and, the older I get, the more present it becomes. Music can often be the most direct way to step into that river.”

That seeker's heart is the tie that so often binds these songs together. Whether the search for place and purpose is of a spiritual or geographical nature, few writers capture the journey as thoughtfully as Adams. An Alabama native, Adams says he feels most comfortable in motion and doesn't have a strong sense of being Southern, even though his music is rooted in that world in so many ways. The first verse of the album's mesmerizing lead track, “Good Man,” exemplifies his plight: “This old house is falling down. Every step I take makes a hollow sound. Should I walk away? Should I push on through? What in the world can a good man do?”

Even as Adams goes on to sing of “laughing eyes with a touch of grey” and walking “a mile across the kitchen floor” in order to set various scenes, he leaves room for the listener to crawl inside his stories and make them their own. Striking that balance is the songwriter's eternal struggle, but one Adams seems to have mastered after years of toiling on his own and collaborating with co-writers like Kim Richey, Caitlin Canty, and Todd Lombardo.

“I don't think I'm very good at co-writing because my process seems so weird and long and tedious to me,” Adams confides. “It's hard to allow someone into that space, but there a few folks where our sensibilities are aligned and we're not just trying to bang out a song in a day. I want to feel as close to the songs I co-write as the ones I write alone. Writers like Kim Richey have such an economy and depth to the ideas that come out of their mouths and hands — there's wisdom there. I want to be more like that.”

In addition to this release, Adams is currently putting his classical composition studies to work on a piece for violin and piano — an aspect of his craft and education that got set aside somewhere along the way to now. “I've wondered a lot why I spent all that time studying music in school and how my composer hat fits in with or hinders my songwriting,” he says. “Some of it was definitely useless to me, then and now. But some of it has left its mark on how I listen, and how I think of arranging songs, and how I communicate with players who are playing on them. Also, writing in such an extremely simple and constrained musical language makes all your choices much more delicate, so I spend a lot of time crafting even the simplest melody.”

A Face Like Mine's songs were composed all over the world, from Alabama to India, and they dig into topics are disparate as the desperation of addiction (“Lorraine”), the grappling of self-image (“Who Else Could I Be”), the vitriol of politics (“We Are”), and the genetics of suffering (“A Face Like Mine”). “We Are” and “Who Else Could I Be” were originally written for a dance piece that Gina Patterson choreographed for the San Angelo Civic Ballet. Even so, Adams made sure the songs could stand alone in their own world no matter what else was swirling around them — confidence and completeness in action.

As a work of musical art, A Face Like Mine fulfills the promise of Peter Bradley Adams. And rarely has an artist's standing still sounded so divine.
Venue Information:
The High Watt
One Cannery Row
Nashville, TN, 37203
http://thehighwatt.com/