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High Noon 3

High Noon 3

Sat · May 6, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$7.00 - $10.00

This event is 18 and over

High Noon is a Happening at Mercy Lounge. A local gathering of great minds and good vibes. The music is synonymous with Outsiders, Garage Rock delinquents, Drone Seekers, Mods, psychedelic cowboys and any living being in search of a good groove. To celebrate our third High Noon, we will be taking over both The Mercy Lounge and The High Watt. Throughout the night, curated analogue Light shows will fill both stages.

Liz Cooper & The Stampede
Liz Cooper & The Stampede
From the tender age of one to the invincible age of 23, Liz Cooper has been moving and traveling through America and through life to the beat of her own drum. Wanderlust has been in her bones since birth and it translates through her music and songwriting in it’s own unique way. Leaving behind her family, friends and college golf scholarship (yes, she can kick your ass on the links and do it with a smile), she hit the road and headed for Nashville, Tennessee, a place she has been calling home for the past 4 years. After wandering around Nashville for the first few months she eventually found her niche at Nashville Music House Studio. Not only is this where her first EP “Monsters” was recorded and mixed, but also where she met a group of friends to begin the full band experience. The Stampede consists of Liz Cooper on lead vocals and rhythm/lead guitar, from Atlanta, Georgia, Grant Prettyman on bass and native Tennessean, Ky Baker on drums. Predominantly playing as a three piece, Liz Cooper & The Stampede is a folk, psychedelic rock band who’s influences include everything from the sights, sounds and smells of the 60‘s and 70‘s to the sights, sounds, smells and all of the feels of today.
Keeps
Keeps
"Of the many alluring clichés in music criticism, comparing shoegaze music to water is one of the hardest to resist. That said, Nashville psychedelic pop act Keeps evoke nothing so much as a lazy river, with yearning vocals floating along atop a gentle but insistent tide of echoing guitar textures and rhythms." -Walt Lewellyn (Weld for Birmingham)
Lasso Spells
Lasso Spells
Charlie & The Evil Mothers
Charlie & The Evil Mothers
“And there's even some evil mothers, well they're gonna tell you that everything is just dirt…”

A name appropriately inspired by The Velvet Underground’s “Sweet Jane”, Charlie & The Evil Mothers breaks all the rules of verse, leaving you with a fresh, albeit fittingly muddled, insight on growing into your own, in this case, both personally and musically. Writer and front man Charlie Shea brings us through a sharp dream-like set that leaves you wide awake and paralyzed. Hailing originally from Middletown, RI, Shea holds onto his sarcastic New England rawness while incorporating a shiny ‘60s pop quality. The Nashville transplant has taken in his new surroundings and situations and twisted and morphed them into a conglomerate of sound leaving us to think only of what’s to come.
Stationwagon
Stationwagon
Teddy and the Rough Riders
Teddy and the Rough Riders
A country rock n roll band out of Nashville, TN
OJR
OJR
"I grew up down round the Baby Blue Ridge," sings Oliver John-Rodgers—more commonly known as OJR—on the title track of his second full-length, Human Style (2012). The grandson of two country-music- and bluegrass-fanatics on both sides of the family, OJR, born in Virginia in 1992, was raised more directly on the angsty, grunge dynamics of Nirvana, Cracker, and Pixies. It's no wonder, then, that after a sort of "prodigal" return to the South—following four whirlwind years of soul-searching and adventure in the concrete jungles of New York, OJR relocated to Nashville in 2014—he has come to acquire the nickname "Acid Cowboy." "Rowdy and energetic," comments Philip Obenschain (No Country for New Nashville, July 2015), "the talented performer certainly flexes an affinity for country and folk he's adopted as part of his image. But his sound truly lands more in the rock realm, with fuzzy, indie, and psychedelic sensibilities, and earnest, electrifying songwriting." Such is the dualist nature of OJR, a bitter Southerner, a discontentedly old-fashioned millennial, an Acid Cowboy—who's perfectly content with calling it like he sees it. "I don't wanna be a part of this selfie situation," begins the second verse of "My Generation," the begrudgingly bouncy, bubblegum-pop single off Nashville Demos, OJR's third full-length release (2015). But "Aw," he goes on bemoaning, "I'm a part of the equation, and I don't wish to be." There's a restlessness in his songs, a supreme desire for more—more than, one might imagine, whatever the Good Book promised, or the Human Condition allows, or the American Dream offers. Eternally straddling a line between marketable/accessible and critical/challenging epitomizes the "OJR sound": It's at once alienating and universal. Such is, after all, the dualist nature of OJR.
But "dual" means "two," and to imply OJR wears only two hats is a grave understatement. While High School and Human Style—his first two LPs, respectively—reside exclusively in a folk-friendly, singer-songwriter neighborhood (à la Bright Eyes/Ryan Adams/Elliot Smith), 2015's Nashville Demos saw OJR exploring sonic terrain as diverse as grunge ("Numb"), outlaw country ("Runnin' from the Law"), doowop ("In Love with a Bowler"), sensual, 70's groove ("Lips on Fire"), and garage rock ("Front-Door Man.") Recorded in various bedrooms in cities all over the world—New York, London, Paris, and Nashville, to name a few--these "demos" certainly blur the line between home-recordings and a proper, studio-grade album. Ever the mercurial perfectionist, OJR might have self-produced all ten tracks on Apple's free, built-in software GarageBand, but nonetheless insisted on the time and attention to detail one is more likely to expect from a professionally tracked studio album than from anything made in a bedroom on a MacBook. To call, perhaps tongue-in-cheek, this album a collection of demos is OJR's way of saying it could go both ways: He's an artist and producer, a singer and songwriter, a Virginia boy and cosmopolitan. He's the Acid and the Cowboy. Such is the dualist nature of OJR, far more than that of just another rock and roller.
Venue Information:
Mercy Lounge
1 Cannery Row
Nashville, TN, 37203
http://mercylounge.com/