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The Ones - Full Band Performances

The Ones - Full Band Performances

Jess Nolan, Shannon LaBrie, Katie Pruitt, Kyshona Armstrong, Laurel & the Love In

Wed · January 11, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$8.00 - $11.00

This event is 18 and over

Jess Nolan
Jess Nolan
JESS NOLAN, A 23-YEAR-OLD NEW JERSEY NATIVE LABELED AS AN OLD SOUL, HAS BEEN COMPARED TO STRONG FEMALE SONGWRITERS LIKE JONI MITCHELL AND CAROLE KING.

SHE CURRENTLY RESIDES IN NASHVILLE WHERE SHE SHARES HER STORIES THROUGH HER ORIGINAL SOUL-INFLUENCED POP MUSIC. SINCE MOVING TO TENNESSEE A LITTLE OVER ONE YEAR AGO, JESS'S CAREER HAS BEEN GAINING QUICK MOMENTUM. SHE HAS PERFORMED ALL OVER TOWN AT RENOWNED VENUES LIKE THE BLUEBIRD CAFE, 3RD & LINDSLEY, AND EXIT/IN. JESS WAS A FINALIST IN LIGHTNING 100 AND BMI'S 2016 ROAD TO ROO COMPETITION AND THE GRAND PRIZE WINNER FOR THEIR 2016 MUSIC CITY BIG BREAK COMPETITION.

JESS IS A GRADUATE FROM THE BRUCE HORNSBY CREATIVE AMERICAN MUSIC PROGRAM AT THE FROST SCHOOL OF MUSIC AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI. SHE COMPETED AND PLACED IN FOUR FESTIVAL MIAMI SONGWRITER'S SHOWCASES AND WON FIRST PLACE IN 2014 FOR HER SONG, "BURN," EARNING HER A SLOT OPENING FOR JORMA KAUKONEN, FOUNDING MEMBER OF JEFFERSON AIRPLANE.

JESS'S DEBUT EP, "STRIKE A MATCH", IS AVAILABLE ON SPOTIFY AND ITUNES.
Shannon LaBrie
Shannon LaBrie
Shannon LaBrie: War & Peace (official release April 1st)

Music by Nashville chanteuse Shannon LaBrie defies genre and brings to life insightful stories of a woman who remains true to herself in a life where uncertainty is certain. The Lincoln, NE native instantly became a favorite among music fans and critics alike with her powerful 2013 debut Just Be Honest. With her lead single, "I Remember a Boy," the independent release reached inside the Top Ten on iTunes and the Triple A Radio charts. Famed music blogger Bob Lefsetz wrote, "This track affected me. Made me believe like the great singer-songwriters of yore, maybe this woman has something to say. That in this crazy, mixed up, shoot-up world she can illuminate her story and people can relate."

In April 2016, LaBrie returns with her introspective sophomore album, War & Peace. Tracked live at Nashville's House of Blues Studio D with producer Tom Michael, War & Peace is an emotionally-charged collection of deep Americana soul that gives voice to the love and loss Labrie experienced throughout her life. "When I listen to music," Labrie says, "a lot of times, it's to make me feel good. But a lot of other times, it's to make me not feel alone. I started writing this album after a loss that put me at war with everything in my life. These songs are small doses of the war I feel inside and the peace I long to find."

The title track "War & Peace," is inspired by her boyfriend's unwavering commitment to their relationship following the loss of their unborn son -- a tragedy that continues to shake LaBrie's heart to this day. "I feel very fortunate that we made it through the past five years." LaBrie continues to explore love in the stirring rocker "It Took My Whole Life." The smooth and steady "Crumble" addresses how consuming love can feel, and the soulful "Ain't Just a Feeling" captures the solace love provides. "There was a time when love was a far-off dream," she says. "Feeling good, feeling like a woman, feeling beautiful wasn't something that came easily. 'Ain't Just a Feeling' came from a moment when I was able to step out of the sadness and just be happy."

LaBrie calls out American politicians in the fiery opener "It's Political," while "American Dream," celebrates feeling thankful to live in a country that offers its citizens a life of endless possibility as a basic human right.

Anchoring the soul of the album are the deeply emotional "Alcohol" and "Heaven Crashed Down." "Alcohol" is a moving ballad about trying to save a loved one from a life of addiction, but in trying, only kills the savior. In LaBrie's own words "There are people who are addicted to alcohol and there are people addicted to trying to fix the people addicted to alcohol. It's all addiction." In "Heaven Crashed Down," LaBrie gives a visual account of the painful loss of her father to cancer when she was only 13. She sings, "He was all we had, he was all I'd lost. The morning heaven crashed down, I grew up."

Austin Chronicle calls LaBrie, "a true guitarist singer/songwriter whose soulful voice's sensual honey-crisp highs brings to mind the late, great Jeff Buckley." She has opened for Gabe Dixon, Phoenix, ZZ Ward, The Head and the Heart, The Wild Feathers, Michael Franti and Valerie June. Her résumé includes South By Southwest, the Austin City Limits Festival, Road to the Hangout and Road to Bonnaroo.
Katie Pruitt
Katie Pruitt
Katie Pruitt is a storyteller first and a singer second. This young writer has a knack for touching on topics most writers shy away from. Topics such as war, politics, and being young and vulnerable. Growing up in North Georgia and moving to Athens after graduating high school defined her background in folk and blues music. She combines these two classic styles of music with pop styles and creates a sound you've never heard before. She is in the process of recording her debut EP which will be available in the Fall 2016.
Kyshona Armstrong
Kyshona Armstrong
For a singer-songwriter, there's no more basic function than getting onstage and getting something personal off your chest. The therapeutic qualities of the experience have seduced countless confessional composers, some of whom make known that they hold unfiltered expression as their highest artistic aim.

Kyshona Armstrong started out enabling others to enjoy the healing properties of songwriting, and keeping her thoughts to herself. When you're a music therapist to incarcerated and institutionalized adults and school children with emotional behavior disorders, artistic considerations aren't even on the table.

"I definitely had to accept the fact that when I'm writing with a patient, whatever they want to do is what they want to do," Armstrong tells the Scene as she nurses a latte in East Nashville. "It's their song: 'Even if it might not fit in a form, if that's what you want to say, say it. We're not writing a big hit. This is for you.' "

When Armstrong worked first in the state mental hospital, then the public school system in Georgia, she found that her co-writers often clung to chant-like, circular song ideas. "They would find this melody they liked and they would stick to it," she explains. "It was theirs to keep. It wasn't hard to hold onto."

Armstrong had focused on oboe at the University of Georgia — that and steel drums, which she played in the college's Hawaiian-shirt-sporting ensemble, Tropical Breeze. But since neither instrument was all that well suited to coaxing patients into musical self-expression, she got into singing, playing acoustic guitar and songwriting.

When describing the positions she held during her decade or so in the mental health field, she punctuates each chapter with the same phrase: "That got kinda heavy." The weight of it was what eventually moved her to begin penning her own tunes.

"A lot of my first songs were dealing with what I saw my patients struggling with," she recalls. "A lot of my songs were about the stories that I would hear from them. Because I can only take on so much of people dumping. So I had to get rid of it and shed it somehow. I think telling their stories was one way for me to go out in the world and be like, 'There's so much more happening out there.' For me, that was therapeutic. I don't like to talk about myself, but I'll talk about everybody else if you want me to share a story."

At a certain point, her emotional investment in her patients' pain became too much to purge at coffeehouse open mics. "You've gotta know when to tap out," she says. "I was like, 'I'm not of any use to these kids if I can't give myself as fully as I used to.' "

So Armstrong got on the college singer-songwriter circuit, blending skills of empathizing and entertaining. Her set lists might put a strummy version of Britney Spears' "Toxic" next to "Confined," a song she'd written with a couple of 20-somethings in the mental hospital. They were the hip-hop heads in the patients' band — otherwise made up of Elvis-obsessed middle-aged men — and they'd wanted a song in the group repertoire that spoke to their own experience.

Besides teaching institutionalized adults and emotionally troubled school kids how to have healthy interactions with instruments in hand, Armstrong served a similar mission on the board of the Southern Girls Rock Camp in Athens, Ga. And that made her a shoo-in to volunteer at last summer's Tennessee Teens Rock Camp, where she met a bunch of the women with whom she'll perform at the girl group tribute She's a Rebel a few days after playing her own show at 12th & Porter.

Armstrong moved to Nashville in January 2014, spending the first couple months commuting back to Athens to record her album Go, but easily made friends and landed bookings in local folk singer-songwriter, pop and soul scenes once she was around more. Smack-dab in the middle ofGo is a song that distills the insights of her therapeutic work and the artistic aspirations she's developed since. Called "Cornelius Dupree," it's the turbulent channeling of a black man's real-life experience serving 30 years in Texas for rape and robbery before being exonerated. Rather than narrate the external details of Dupree's story, Armstrong gives voice to the searing physical and emotional strain he must've felt having to defend his innocence for so long.

Armstrong has reached the point where she embraces repetitive internal rhythms that emerge in some of her songwriting — likening them to both gospel spirituals and the viscerally simplistic utterances of her former patients — and she's delivering her roots-soul originals with articulate warmth and newly claimed authority.

"I feel like I'm only just now stepping into this activist role," she says, "or not activist, but someone who speaks out or brings up a subject that's uncomfortable. In the past, I haven't been the one to [say], 'I'm gonna throw some mess on the table, and we're gonna talk about it.' But I want to be."

TICKETING & RESERVATION INFO:

NO MUSIC CHARGE!

Dinner reservations are highly recommended and can be made at www.venkmans.com (see "Reservations"), or by calling 470-225-6162.
Laurel & the Love In
Laurel & the Love In
Dear Mother,

I meant to write to you before this, and I hope you haven’t been worried. I am in Nashville and it is really beautiful here. A beautiful scene. We’ve been here a week, me and this rock and roll band that calls itself the Love-In. We’re making this movie. Well it’s not really a movie, but a short film. Well it’s not visual or anything, more like an album. Only while we’re making it, I’m in it.

I won’t bore you with the whole thing, how it happened, but I really tried, because I knew you wanted me to. It just didn’t work out with me and Danny, and so I have come here and it is a really beautiful scene. I don’t want you to worry about me. I’m with the Love-In now.

There’s a boy named Ian Kendall who plays guitar. He’s shown me around a bit. He’s always in such a hurry, yet somehow always late. And there’s a girl named Veronica Selby with eyes like a doe and a voice like a little birdie. She hangs around with a boy named Michael Rasile, who hits his drums so hard you wouldn’t believe! It’s powerful stuff the way he plays, but my new friend John Lattimer warned me about listening to him. John plays the bass like thunder and walks around followed by a cloud of smoke.

We’re all getting a van together and we’re just gonna go. We’re piling in together, traveling all over the Heartland, playing our music and bringing people into our movie. Please don’t worry. We’re welcoming everyone to the Love-In.

Completely and Honestly Truly,
Laurel & the Love-In
Venue Information:
Mercy Lounge
1 Cannery Row
Nashville, TN, 37203
http://mercylounge.com/